What’s in a bumper sticker?

Bumper stickers are purchased by millions of people all over the world.  Found in every single gas station, amusement parks and novelty store, many bumper stickers are characterized in some manner whether it is humorous, confrontational, religious, sassy and or even cute.

Bumper stickers generally show some type of personality trait or belief that the person carries.  So does that mean the guy who has “Cut me off and I’ll find you”, will find me if I were drift into his lane without a signal light?  NO! Well hopefully not, but he may try to make you feel uncomfortable for your actions.  He might lay on his horn, tailgate you, shake his fist in frustration, you may even see him attempt to speak to you via your rear view mirror.

Washington Post ~

A study by Colorado State University social psychologist William Szlemko informs us that ” Drivers of cars with bumper stickers, window decals, personalized license plates and other ‘territorial markers’ not only get mad when someone cuts in their lane or is slow to respond to a changed traffic light, but they are far more likely than those who do not personalize their cars to use their vehicles to express rage — by honking, tailgating and other aggressive behavior.

It does not seem to matter whether the messages on the stickers are about peace and love — ‘Visualize World Peace,’ ‘My Kid Is an Honor Student’ — or angry and in your face — ‘Don’t Mess With Texas,’ ‘My Kid Beat Up Your Honor Student.’ “

The key to the phenomenon apparently lies in the idea of territoriality. Drivers with road rage tend to think of public streets and highways as “my street” and “my lane” — in other words, they think they “own the road.”

— So knowing this, does this mean I should be cautious of drivers with bumper stickers? Should I be nervous of my actions while in proximity to a “Princess Protection Transportation Unit. Ahhh – Maybe, never really thought about it though.

Staying relaxed, refreshed and always aware of your own surrounding’s and action’s. You should arrive to your destination safely and more importantly, stress free.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/06/15/AR2008061501963.html?sid=ST2008061502199



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